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Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Jimmy Dawkins - Transatlantic 770


Though some reports have suggested he has been hard to work with, Dawkins' "Transatlantic 770" nevertheless is a blistering guitar driven Chicago blues affair. Yes, there are horns but they are definitely brushed to the site and do not overtake (as can usually happen) as Jimmy's sharp, stinging electric leads plow their way through effectively throughout this platter. Most tunes are given a slight 70's funk feeling and ballads such as "Think twice before you speak", "The mighty hawk" & "Love and understanding" either use strings or keys (instead of horns) to accompany them which really helps avoid such banal arrangement difficulties. It may seem as though there is not much extended improvisation (though Dawkins comes close on "All for business") but it is not as apparent as other such albums lacking in this department as Jimmy's guitar work is so impressive that one can enjoy the many short lead breaks here just as much as if they had been stretched out a little more. Catchy tunes abound as half the album surprisingly includes Dawkins originals, five to be exact. My favorite parts are the real upbeat numbers like the rocking "Stone dead" and the lightning speed of the closing "No more trouble" which has a very busy bass line job for Bob Brunning but he keeps up the pace tremendously here. This probably doesn't touch the best of it's genere but it sure can't be far off that level.

Post: http://www73.zippyshare.com/v/CdUDPhfm/file.html

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

thank you

Kelly said...

That's some good tunes...

thefatone said...

Many thanks, great site

Ballas said...

Thank you very much for the post.

Juanjo said...

Great stuff, Thanks!

Franck Goldwasser said...

I had the privilege to work with Jimmy on the road and in the studio. I found him easy to work with. He was open to ideas and always gave 100%. He was one of my heroes, in my opinion one of the most interesting guitarists of the post-war era.

Gerard Herzhaft said...

Thanks Frank for your nice comment about Jimmy Dawkins. And thanks also to have produced probably the best latter days album Jimmy Dawkins recorded

Xyros said...

Also thank you Frank for sharing your memories of working with Jimmy.

Franck Goldwasser said...

Merci, Gérard, je suis extrêmement flatté. J'ai récemment ré-écouté les deux CDs Fedora après ne pas les avoir entendus depuis des lunes, et je dois dire que j'ai été agréablement surpris!

goinsidemyhead said...

now the case of Brother Jimmy is a fascinating one especially this album, never anything that exciting really with fairly ordinary but attractive vocals, solid but sometimes overblown arrangements but terrible ideas throughout, The Things That I used to Do done by Freddy King is a monster but Jimmy romps through it like he's late for supper, but does produce some stinging guitar, a bit of a tribute to Freddy I suppose. I mean unless the song is The Thrill is Gone forget about synthetic strings and stick to horns or organ. And some of the guitar work is spotty..just telling it like is Ma-nigg, can I get a witness? Yeah longer tunes but nobody brought any bacon...but know what, so what, because every second listen gets a third with this dude, same thing as Luther Guitar Junior Johnson, Luther Tucker and other dudes who never have enough quality material. Jimmy you rock.